Dry Salted Duck Eggs ( Kai Kame )

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I've made salted eggs before, normally using the brine technique. That involves soaking them in saturated brine, and letting them absorb the salt.
But there's a second kind of salted egg, the dry salting. That's salted in the salt and white clay, with soot, ashes and charcoal powder to dry them out. The result is a firmer egg yolk than the wet method, but the strong salt flavor remains, the end flavors are the same.

Since Songkran is coming, and white clay is sold everywhere, (it's used to powder the faces of people, a more polite alternative to spraying them with water), I thought now would be a good time to make some dry salty eggs with them.

I'm also going to be making salty egg sweet pies, a tradition for this time of year, and so I'll need some salty eggs for this.

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Ingredients
8 Duck Eggs
220 gms Salt
100 mls Water
450 gms White Clay
Ash, Soot, Rice Husk Ash etc.

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Preparation
1. Boil the water and dissolve the salt into it. To get a saturated solution of salt, you need to boil water, it won't dissolve properly if cold.
2. Leave it to cool.
3. Mix in the white clay with your hand, you want a good thick paste. If it's too thin add some of your soot or ash to it to thicken it up, or more clay.
4. Cover the egg with a decent thick layer of this paste, then drop the clay covered egg into a soot/ash mix
5. Leave it to dry in a cool dark place, after 7 days it's salty enough for a decent salty fried egg, after 15 days it will make a good boiled salty egg.

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